Honey Filling Machine

$1,499.00

Honey Filling Machine

This is for the professional requiring fast output and accuracy. Ease of operation and easy to programme.

Suitable for Baume celcius below 44 degrees, 5-90 % C fluidity semi-crystalline honey.

Filling weight range 100-5000 grams. Filling height 0-33cm adjustable.

Filling efficiency 470 x 500 gm bottles an hour. Filling error 1%.

Anti drip discharge port.

Manual or auto fill.

Counting function.

240 volt single phase. Australian electrical plug with earth. Also supplied 12 volt lead for battery power.

Japanese motor.

Doesn’t require an air compressor.

Heavy duty gears.

The inlet tube on the left is put in honey source and drawn from there. Extend the hose long enough and you can empty I.B.C’s / 44 gallon drums. No need to fill a hopper.

Includes free freight anywhere in Australia.

Manufacturers instructions as per pics. I have also written more concise instructions in plain English available for customers only.

ALSO SEE   Honey Filling Machine 2 – Bee Equipment Australia

See programming videos

RIGHT CLICK HERE   Honey Filling Machine Instructions – YouTube  

Shows tare, auto fill and clean.

 

RIGHT CLICK HERE   First test of my honey filling machine – YouTube

Shows prime with syringe , M1 set weight button , auto fill and product review.

 

RIGHT CLICK HERE   Installation and Use of Honey Filling Machine – YouTube

Shows prime with syringe , clean , and setting weight.

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VISCOSITY OF HONEY

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1081/JFP-120016626

This is an excellent article dealing with the viscosity of Australian honey.

I will quote…..” Knowledge of the rheological behavior of honey is of practical interest and is critical during storage, handling and processing.[1,2] Viscosity, one of the important rheological
properties of honey, is influenced by several factors. The viscosity of honey is highly temperature sensitive.[3] As honey is heated, it initially undergoes a very rapid decrease in
viscosity per degree rise in temperature. At temperatures in excess of 30C the change in viscosity is much slower, while between 45C and 60C the decrease in viscosity is almost
negligible.[4] Generally, as temperature rises, viscosity falls because there is less molecular friction and hydrodynamic forces decrease.[5]
Moisture content is another factor influencing viscosity. The moisture content of honey shows varietal differences and may range from 13%[1] to 29%[6] but is generally considered to have an average of 17.2%.[3,7–9] Generally, higher moisture content results in lower viscosity.
Honeys of similar moisture content but different floral origin vary to some extent in viscosity.[3,4] These variations are attributed to the composition of individual sugars and to
non-sugar, and colloidal material.[3,4] The major sugars in honey are the monosaccharides fructose and glucose.

Additionally, small amounts of disaccharides (sucrose, maltose, and
turanose) are present. The gross physical attributes of honey are largely determined by the types and concentrations of carbohydrates.[10] The higher the number of monosaccharide units the higher the viscosity.[5] While, there is no research published on the sugar concentration dependence of honey viscosity it is proposed that viscosity can be related to
the molality of solutes.[11]