Queen Bee Artificial Insemination Kit

$3,999.00

Queen Bee Artificial Insemination Kit

FREE INSURED FREIGHT IN AUSTRALIA.

WORLD WIDE DISTRIBUTION. FOR OUTSIDE OF AUSTRALIA PLEASE ENQUIRE RE FREIGHT AND INSURANCE RATES. PRICES ARE IN AUSTRALIAN DOLLARS AUD. PAYMENT DETAILS BSB 066-134 ACCOUNT 10620669 COMMONWEALTH BANK , BRANCH CANNINGTON, SWIFT CTBAAU2S

IN STOCK. 1 ONLY LEFT. Latest technology only came onto market 2020. Award winner. Chinese patent.

I had an expert in Perth carefully examine the working components. Everything functions as it should in a smooth and precise fashion. You won’t be disappointed in the quality. This is A grade engineering. Comparable to the German model which is no longer manufactured. Feedback following sales was all positive.

 

 

This is what is in the kit

 

  1. Queen artificial insemination high-end version

 

back hook *1 item

 

belly hook *1 item

 

Micro syringe *1 item

 

Insemination needle *5 items

 

Induction room *1 item

 

Anesthesia room *1 item

 

Protective case *1 item

 

Instruction manual *1 item

 

 

  1. Anesthesia system

 

Cylinder *1 item

 

Bubbler *1 item

 

Base *1 item

 

Valve *1 item

 

Gas hose *1 item

 

Principle of anesthesia (A.B) Group *1 item

 

 

  1. Microscope

 

Matching microscope with light

Eyepiece 10 X

Objective lens 2 X   4 X

Multiplying 20 X  40 X

*1 set

 

Instructions for assembly of equipment in English with diagrams.

Instructions for charging CO2 generator in Chinese with diagrams.

Instructions for charging CO2 generator in English. I am the author.

Carbon dioxide gas, is made by the generator using food safe basic chemicals available in supermarkets. The gas is to anesthetize the drone and queen bees. The formula and procedure is in the English instructions. It is very easy. Simply add part A and part B with water. We will supply A and B with the kit.

 

 

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Price includes insured freight delivery to anywhere in Australia. No P.O. Boxes please. Will need to be signed for.

 

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How to set up

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(2) Facebook 

 

Overview of equipment excluding microscope

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Making of carbon dioxide gas. I supply the ingredients and written instructions in English.

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Full process after set up

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Complete process

 

Procedure for collection of drone semen

 

Setting up equipment

 

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Instrumental insemination is a valuable breeding technique that offers a way to utilize the desirable traits. It allows types of mating that are not possible with natural mating such as mating a queen to a single drone or to a few specific drones, mating mutant queens and drones and mating a queen to her own male offspring (Harbo, 1986a). Naturally, mated queens could mate with drones from unknown origins that could result in bees with undesirable characteristics. Instrumental insemination enables bee breeders to design breeding programs in which complete genetic isolation is maintained with the ability to produce consistent, high quality queens selected for a specific trait and high brood viability (Page and Laidlaw, 1982 and Page et al., 1983).

Beekeepers replace their queens annually to maintain high performance and low levels of Africanization in commercial colonies. Requeening is also required as colonies led by young queens are more productive than those led by old queens (Kostarelou-Demianidou et al., 1995). Progeny of old queens could also have undesirable characteristics, e.g., high susceptibility to diseases and strong defensive behavior (Free, 1987).

Instrumental insemination technique is widely employed in queen breeding programs for the improvement of honeybee races to have best colony performance. Because of conflicting reports in the literature, research is still needed to study factors that affect rearing, insemination and introduction of II queens that would lead them to have better evaluations. The present study has been undertaken to compare the performance of naturally mated and instrumentally inseminated queens for survival, brood production and honey production.

To provide more natural conditions pre- and post-insemination, virgins should emerge individually in nucleus colonies, be removed briefly for insemination and CO2 treatment and then returned unrestricted. Queens given this treatment generally lay eggs sooner, survive longer and are more productive (Cobey, 1983).

The age of the queen at insemination influences the number of spermatozoa stored in the spermatheca which increases the possibility of early supersedure. Queens naturally mate between 5 and 13 days of age. Studies by Woyke and Jasinski (1976) indicated the optimal age for a queen to be instrumentally inseminated is 5 to 10 days. Fewer sperms enter the spermatheca when queens are inseminated at 14 days or older, which might lead to lower survival rate as reported by Harbo and Szabo (1984). They inseminated queens at two and three weeks of age with small doses of semen (2.7 Fl). Woyke (1966) showed little advantage in the insemination of two small doses over one dose of 8 Fl, a procedure that also requires more handling of queens, which increases the possibility of injuries and infection.

Queens reared from eggs of 48-72 h old were heavier and had bigger thoraces than queens reared from larvae 0- 24h old (Hatch et al., 1999). Also, queens reared from younger larvae (12-24 h) have more ovarioles, larger spermatheca and stored higher number of spermatozoa (Woyke, 1966Szabo and Townsend, 1974).

Temperature affects the migration rate of semen into the spermatheca. Queens held at brood nest temperature (34°C) immediately after insemination stored 26 % more sperm than queens held at room temperature (24°C) (Woyke and Jansinski, 1973).

In conclusion, field performance of II queens is influenced by many factors. Nevertheless, the present experiments show that successful insemination and high performance levels can be achieved when careful attention is given to queen rearing conditions, pre- and post-insemination treatments, semen doses and quality and technique of insemination utilized. Nelson and Laidlaw (1988) suggested that II queens perform as successfully as NM queens and that findings contrary to this might be due to the lack of some special beekeeping and/ or insemination procedures given to II queens. Conditions that had led to have II queens exceed NM queens in field performance (Wilde, 1989Szalai, 1995) should be utilized and improved. Controlled mating is essential to improve honeybee-breeding stock and to maintain high performance in field colonies. We show that instrumental insemination is a viable and insured method that bee breeders and beekeepers can rely on for that purpose.

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